Fabric Fail: Static Cling

Introduction

FABRIC FAILS—WHAT THEY ARE AND HOW YOU CAN PREVENT THEM

Fabric Fails happen when you find yourself in clothes made of mystery fabric. They may be cheaper for manufactures, but can be a disaster for you. The problem is, it’s easy to mistake a mystery fabric for cotton. They can look like cotton and even feel like cotton—but only at first.

Learn more about static cling (a fabric fail) to see what awaits if you don’t check the label.

Fabric Fail-Static Cling

STATIC CLING

57% OF PEOPLE SAY THEY ARE BOTHERED BY STATIC CLING.1

HERE’S WHAT THEY’RE SAYING

After my daughter was born, I started to order clothes for both of us online. It’s harder to determine fabric that way (though I now know you can check the item details!) and I ended up ordering a 100% polyester dress for work. I don’t have time for returns these days, so I decided to wear the dress for an important meeting. Big mistake. 20 minutes before my meeting, my colleague was spraying me down with anti-static spray because the dress was clinging to me in all the wrong places. I ended up walking more …

I bought a long, flowy polyester dress for an outdoor wedding last summer. We had to walk quite a ways to get to the ceremony, and the dress kept clinging and wrapping around my legs. I almost wiped out a hundred times.

ABOUT STATIC CLING

We’ve all experienced static cling. It’s when a piece of clothing sticks to another piece of clothing, or your body. It occurs most often with synthetic fabrics.

CAUSES

The basic concept behind static cling is that of static electricity. As negative and positive charges attract each other, the two materials will stick to one another, causing static cling. Static cling occurs only when two different materials are rubbed together because they will have different electrical charges and thus attract each other.

TYPES OF FABRIC TO WATCH OUT FOR

Cotton and rayon do not have static charges and therefore are less likely to cling.

Polyesters and nylons hold static charges and therefore are more likely to cling. They’re also less likely to be breathable.2

BOTTOM LINE

Look for cotton on the label.

CHECK THE LABEL

  1. Cotton Incorporated Lifestyle Monitor.™
  2. Marjory Joseph. Introductory Textile Science, 5th Edition, 1984.

Conclusion

Check back for other fabric fail courses!

Learn more about Cotton or Nothing: http://www.cottonornothing.com/

CLOSE
CLOSE